Disney’s The Owl House is a Real Hoot!

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Taylor Button, Staff Writer

Witches, magic, portals, and demons are nothing strange in The Owl House, A children’s cartoon on Disney+. Following the story of Luz Noceda, a teenage girl with a wild imagination who finds herself stuck in the world of demons. One amazing thing about this show is the super fun cast of characters. Luz is a relatable protagonist who feels like she doesn’t fit in. When she enters the realm of the witches, however, she finds a community of loveable weirdos, namely Eda the Owl Lady and King. Deciding to stay and learn magic with them over the summer would lead Luz on many incredible adventures.

Pictured left to right; King, Luz, Eda

Luz is a teenage girl who often gets in trouble at school due to her off-the-walls personality and unique interests. Eda is an older woman, full of self-confidence and with a rogue-like nature. She is very steadfast in her beliefs that her way is always best, and that’s why she’s the strongest witch on the boiling isle. These traits make for some very interesting antics when combined with Luz’s reliance on her for knowledge of this world. Their friend King is a small demon with a big personality. He believes he is the king of demons, and that he is the rightful ruler of the Isles. Luz and Eda coddle him though, treating him like a pet and going along with these antics to please him.

Another good point of the show is its cute art style and charming animation. Many children’s cartoons nowadays really rely heavily on simple flash-based animation, stripping the show of both depth and texture in exchange for quicker production times. The Owl House isn’t like this though. The animation is detailed and expressive During important scenes the animation usually switches to a higher framerate, which really helps to make them stand.

Lastly, the LGBTQ+ representation is very relevant and necessary. Most children’s cartoons aren’t very inclusive of the LGBTQ+ community because companies fear the backlash of their audience’s parents. Fortunately this show does not have the same problem. The main character of the show is actually bisexual! She shows interest in boys and girls throughout the first and second seasons, and even has a girlfriend later in the series. Another character, Luz’s close friend Willow, is shown to have two gay fathers. They aren’t recurring characters yet, but I hope that they will be! There are important characters of various other identities within the cast as well. For example, Raine Whispers, a major character in season two of the show, is non-binary and uses they/them pronouns. It’s very cool that children get to grow up and see this kind of diversity in characters they admire.

The only problem I really had with this show was the major cliffhanger which it ended on. Currently there are two seasons totaling 29 episodes. The show’s extended third season was cancelled by Disney, though they will get to come back with three 44 minute long episodes. It feels like a strange move for Disney to cancel The Owl House so soon after its queer themes became very prevalent, but that’s beside the point. Many fans are petitioning Disney to greenlight the show for its full third season and proposed fourth season, but so far they have shown no signs of relenting. Overall, Disney’s The Owl House is beloved by many fans, including myself, who hope to see the show’s continued success.